Monday, July 28, 2014

Mish Mosh Monday #5: Happy Anniversary

Twiddling your thumbs sometimes comes up with a good idea. 

I started thinking about common everyday objects. I wondered how long these ordinary things had been around. I looked it up. Presenting to all those interested dear readers is my "Happy Anniversary List"!
 

1. Post It: 46th Anniversary: Invented in 1968 (source)
It's been described as the solution to a problem nobody realized existed. source



2. @: 43rd Anniversary of common usage source
Once a rarely used key on the typewriter, the graceful character has become the very symbol of modern electronic communication source


3. Automatic Transmission: 74th Anniversary of first common AT w/ parts still used today source
Today I think we will give a little depth to the history of the automatic transmission.  It really is a marvel to behold and yet we take it for granted, just as we have come to expect the sun to rise and set with regularity. source


4. Game of Baseball: 175th year anniversary source
 source
The sport that evokes more nostalgia among Americans than any other is baseball.


5. Game of American Football: 138th year anniversary source
“Some people believe football is a matter of life and death. I'm very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that.” –Bill Shankly source

6. Quilting: 56th century anniversary source



To quilt is to live. source




7. Camera: 514th years anniversary source

“The single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it.”  Ansel Adams source
 
 


8. Oatmeal: 15 centuries anniversary source
It is not true, as the humor website Cracked satirically suggests, that oatmeal was invented by a research scientist at Britain's Royal Academy of Adhesives and Sealants during an experiment in search of new forms of industrial glue. But if your idea of oatmeal is the pasty variety made in a microwave from a packet, the story can seem plausible. source


9.  Lawn Sprinklers: 202nd anniversary source
An 18th century fancy of the royals and wealthy in Europe, the love of lawns spread to places where they could not be maintained with natural rain. It became necessary to carry water to areas that needed supplemental supplies and as the popularity of lawns spread, this required more and more extra effort. Sprinklers, invented in 1871, made lawns possible for everyone. source

10. Envelope: 5,524th year anniversary source

The oldest envelope found, made of
clay to enclose a contract
…there are certain people out there, who live, breathe, eat and drink envelopes. source

A little bit more recognizable envelope

Listed In Chronological Order (oldest first)

Quilting  56 centuries
Envelope  55.5 centuries
Oatmeal  15 centuries
Camera  514 years
Sprinkler  202 years
Baseball Game  175 years
Football Game  138 years
Automatic Transmission  74 years
Post It  46 years
@ sign (in common use)  43 years

Messes Always Come Before Tidiness

Is this really Monday? Design Wall? Not in Nonnie-land!

We had Hubby’s youngest brother visiting us this week. We enjoyed having him here the entire time! There was lots of catch up to do since we haven’t seen him in about 10 years.

You know the old saying… “Guests, like fish, should be thrown out after three days.” It was certainly not true with Younger Brother. I felt at home having him here which, in itself, is a milestone.

While he was here I got a chance to sort through some scrap bins. It was loads of fun, but I made myself a load of work!  My quilt room now looks like a bomb went off in there!



Can I just stop here and quote, loosely, Michio Kaku: “It’s pointless to have a nice clean desk, quilting room, because it means you’re not doing anything.”



Either I’m a hamster running on a wheel or I’m reorganizing!



I’m sorting scraps by color and storing each color in a soft drink box. And don’t try to cozy up to me now! I do not have $1000 dollars in that box on top! I would tell you what’s in the box, but I’ve lost it in the mess “gentrification” project.


Saturday I engaged in re-allotment. Which is defined in Nonnie’s dictionary as moving fabric around to make more room and ending up with just the same amount of fabric just in different locations!


As a result I now have three drawers for blue, instead of two: light blue, medium blue and dark blue. And up- cycled one drawer to two for red and green and … Well, I don’t want to make you depressed because of all of the beautifulness of my organizing. Because all I did was take stuff that had been in drawers to make more room for certain colors and put previous stuff in boxes. I still haven’t figured out where those boxes are going to go!

Certainly not here!

And now, dear readers, my story is told. If you want to see real design walls, check out these sites. Real quilters! Real projects! Just click on a badge from the right sidebar.

Wait! Before you leave, here is the status of the blue block I reported on last week:


Don't adjust your monitor! There is a picture there. And it is what has been done on my blue and white block. More here about said block.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Quilts From My Sewing Machine #7: Marie & Me


You’re in for another trip down memory lane in a quilt that is a collaboration between my Aunt Marie and myself. Those who read my blog know about my muse, my Aunt Marie.

I call these quilts “collaborations” because Aunt Marie either made the blocks or made the quilt top. I take the blocks or flimsy and finish the quilt from there.

This isn’t our first collaboration, but it is the first one I did. You can read about the second collaboration, The Seventies Are Calling, They Want Their Fabric Back here. I’ve already completed our third collaboration, but haven’t posted yet. And…there are still more to come!

I believe in putting labels on quilts! (Yes, I'm still talking about the story of my quilt collaboration! Patience is a virtue!) Most of them are small, but on two I wrote more of a provenance. Marie and Me is one of them. And here is what the label says:




Backside of quilt showing my stitching at age 8
"My Aunt Marie (1905-1997) was a gifted quilter. When I was eight years old (1963) she cut two-inch squares into sets for me so could make nine-patch blocks. I started hand stitching the blocks together but eventually stopped. When I was around eleven or twelve, I picked up the project again and did more blocks. I finally ended up with around 20 blocks with more waiting to be done.
More beginning hand stitching



I had the blocks and squares stored in an old red wicker sewing basket. It followed me through moves, school, college, marriage and children. In 2006, I became interested in quilting. I pulled out the red wicker basket and decided to finish my first quilt. I had to square off the completed blocks, which made them fat in the center column. I wanted them to be highlighted in the finished quilts. All the blocks I did as a child are inside the yellow border. 
The back of the blocks I made as a child. I put them in
chronological order
You can see how the center rows are wider
than the side rows.

squared up the remaining two-inch squares and sewed them into blocks. In order to have the quilt turn out correctly, I delved into my aunt's stash and made a few more blocks.”


Some of the extra blocks I added. I made the one with the bowling ball because
my last name is Bohling. The square at the top right, brown dotted fabric, was
from one of the dresses my Aunt Marie made me. I was in the first grade!
More blocks. Love the kitties and ladybugs!

More blocks: My uncle was in the Marines. The little brown televisions
have cowboys on the screen. Are the ducks cute?
(There is a secret in the quilt. When I was assembling the quilt, I did it in sections: top section, bottom section then the two side sections. When I went to assemble them I found one side section was shorter than the other, by two inches! To make both sides even, I made a row of single squares and sewed it to the bottom of the shorter piece. No one has ever noticed it and it blends in quite nicely. To keep the secret, I'll not tell you where the extra row is!)

“By the time I got around to finishing the quilt in
2009, I had already made quite a few other quilts. Those quilts were all machine quilted by a professional. A good friend of mine, an avid hand quilter, convinced me that I should hand quilt Marie's quilt. I thought it fitting to do it by hand because all of Aunt Marie's quilts were hand quilted. This was 
the first quilt that I hand quilted. From where I began to where it ended, it showed the progression of my skill as a hand quilter. I chose to do a Bishop's fan pattern, and there are many funny fans! I was using a template, but now know a much easier and better way to quilt that pattern.

Thanks, Aunt Marie, for your legacy.”


Here is the label from the back of the quilt. It has the back of one of the first blocks I hand stitched when I was 8.
I think it's adorable all those big stitches and wobbliness. I also included a picture of Aunt Marie and one of me from
when I was 8.

Marie and Me hangs in my bedroom. I deeply love this quilt. I have spent many hours before sleep, before getting up and just lazing on my bed looking at all the blocks and different fabrics. At night, with lights out, it is changed into a study of light and dark. With the street light coming in my room, all that can be seen are light and dark blotches. It is a mottled effect and I love that view of it also.

It is just a humble nine patch quilt, but it enchants me.
 
I also write posts about Aunt Marie’s phenomenal quilts. Here are links to those posts. Get ready to be amazed!
The Gallatin Quilt
Mystery Stars
Pixelated Ponies

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Pass The Peanuts Please! #6


Merry Peanuts Christmas in July!

Through the years many Peanuts-themed fabrics were produced. Right now there isn’t a current fabric of Peanuts Christmas.

Not to be dissuaded, disillusioned, discouraged or defeated, I went a-looking.

My first stop for anything vintage, unusual or gift-worthy is Etsy. All homage to Etsy. If you’ve never visited them, you. are. in. for. a. big. treat. Colossal. Tremendous. Mammoth. Jumbo.

I was not disappointed! There is a plethora of Peanuts Christmas Fabrics! Just type in “Peanuts Christmas Fabric.” Bingo!

Here’s a itsy-bitsy sampling:
ON SALE - Quilting Treasures Peanuts Christmas Time Quilt Fabric White 1/2Y
Peanuts Characters Caroling, small, blue

Peanuts Christmas Fabric Stripe 1 Yard
Peanuts Christmas comic strip panel


Fabric Material Peanuts Christmas Time Holiday Pageant Hunter Green Great for Crafts and Projects Fat Quarter
Peanuts Characters in Holiday Pageant

Peanuts Christmas Fabric Charlie Brown Snoopy Cotton Material Half Yard Rare Hard to Find itsyourcountry
I Want A Dog for Christmas, comic strip
Christmas Time - Peanuts - Quilt Panel Red/Navy 22152-RN
Christmas Time Quilt Panel

Be Merry Holiday Charlie Brown Fabric By The Yard FBTY

Be Merry Holiday Charlie Brown Fabric

And here’s a real find!
A Wonderful Peanuts Charlie Brown Christmas Stocking Soft Book Fabric Panel Free US Shipping
A fabric soft book of Charlie Brown and the Christmas Stocking

I’m sure there’s fabric at Ebay; I didn’t even check. I have had wonderful experiences buying through Etsy. I have never gotten any item that is less than exactly what was described!

Enjoy!

Ta da! Here is the answer to last week’s question: Name the members of Snoopy’s family.

Snoopy has 5 brothers and 2 sisters! Whoda thunk it? Only 5 appeared in the comic strip.
SPIKE

ANDY

OLAF

BELLE
The two that never showed up on the strip:

Molly

Rover

This week’s question:  What did Marcie call Peppermint Patty? What did Peppermint Patty call Charlie Brown?  Leave your answers in the comments below!

Monday, July 21, 2014

Mish Mosh Monday #4: The Great Mosquito Contest

Camping is a great love of mine. I haven’t camped out enough, but there were a couple of years that I went with my kids.
The kids and I always had fun. We played card games, swam in the river, told stories at night in the tent, and ate food you would only eat while camping.
R: Our overloaded car for camping, Middle: Noel Heart cooking, L: Noel Heart & I riding in our boat
When school was out and summer school was over, the kids and I would pack up in the summer and go camping. The first year, we met my Sisty Ugler and her daughter at Chetco River campground, just over the border in Oregon. 
Playing in the sand & water at Chetco River, We weren't much good at pole tents!
The campground was ideal. It had a beautiful, clear river flowing right next to it, there was beach to play on and plenty of space to ride bikes.
Another reason the campground was idyllic was the lack of other campers. The big attraction in camp-grounds in the area was down in Brookings on the coast.
 The Chetco River campground was just used as overflow when the coast campground filled up. Consequently, the river campground was only full on Fridays and Saturdays.
Salamanders! TGS playing Solitaire
The second year, the kids and I went alone. We 
brought our two man boat and would sail, two at a time, on the river. The water was so clear you could see all the way to the bottom, 8-10 feet down, and see salamanders walking on the sandy river bottom. There were wonderful places to swim too.
Nancy Drew in a tree, TGS & Nancy Drew building a fire, Noel Heart
We were getting our fair share of mosquito bites too. Every night, I would be awakened two or three times by someone need me to put Campho Phenique on their itchy bites.
 For fun, I announced a contest. During the week we 
were there, we would see who could get the most mosquito bites.
The rules were: As soon as the mosquitoes came out in the evening, everyone had to put on long-sleeved shirts and pants, then put mosquito repellent on all exposed skin. At the end of the week, the one with the most bites would be declared winner.
 The week we spent camping was the best vacation I've ever been on. I had worked my first year as instructional aide at Montgomery High. Being on vacation with the kids restored my spirits and I found the perspective I needed to continue on.
The end of the week came too soon, but we were anxious to count bites and find our Great Mosquito Contest Winner. 
The turnout was funny: 
1st place: Nancy Drew had over 70 bites
2nd place: TGS had 30. 
3rd place: I had 20 bites. 
4th place: Noel Heart had less than 15
No one even came close to Miss Drew!

We knew then that Nancy Drew must have some
mighty sweet blood to make mosquitoes risk that yucky tasting repellent!

TGS wading in river, Noel Heart & Nancy Drew eating berries they picked, TGS ready for the river
We still talk about that week and laugh about The Great Mosquito Bite Contest and how Nancy Drew won. She always won…even when winning wasn’t good!

Quilter Without A Brain Tries to Make Quilt Block

Ah the beauty, the magnificence of a Lone Star. All those amazing little diamonds joining hands and becoming big diamonds. What a tribute to team work.



It’s a true pleasure to work on this UFO.

Until…
you go to sew in the last backgound triangle…

Pay Close Attention to Right Lower Corner of Picture


Oh yes, dear friends, it’s all fun and games until the seam isn’t long enough!

I’ve been measuring things this way and that…and I haven’t quite decided what I am going to do. Oh well. Like Scarlett O’Hara said, “I won’t think of it now. I’ll think of it later when I can stand it.”

Meanwhile, I was auditioning blocks for the borders of the ghastly beautiful Lone Star. I found some on Quilter’s Cache that were rated easy. I needed easy, I had a lot to make and I didn’t want something with 57 pieces. I’ve already done that with the Farmer’s Wife!

My first was Railroad Crossing. 4 hourglass blocks, on point. 4 16-patch. Yes, I think this is easy.

Yes, but did you consider the number of pieces?  (102) Yeah, but the 16 patches are string pieced!

When I Should Have Had This

So I Started Out With This


Pull out white fabric from drawer, unfold all 2 yards of it and cut another strip, sub-cut to squares, sew to short strips.

Onto the next step! Whistling with lighter spirits, I moved on to the half-square triangles. I had a speedy method to make them. Off I glided to my sewing machine...


The 7.5" Behemouth




Everything was just fine until I realized that there were four HSTs in each corner...not just one. And not only that, they were 2", not the 7.5" I had just done!

I cut down one 2" HST from each of the 7" ones. Still had to make more blue and white...drag out the white fabric again. Spent 15 minutes trying to find where I put away the blue fabric! Finally:


Ah, That's More Like It!
As I made a mock-up of the block, I realized that the corners of the 16 patches were made with 2 white/white HST.


Drag out white fabric, unfold, cut, refold.   







All I had left was to sew together the 16-patches and put it together. Yup, that's all.




Hmmm, do you know how many times I've taken out the white fabric?




And what about all those stitches I've ripped out?


Nope, I'm remembering Scarlett O'Hara.


"Fiddle de dee, tomorrow is another day!

Now that you've heard my woes, go to the following parties, with much more cheerful stories than mine! (Badges in right sidebar)
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